ADAPTIVE STREET AND GROUND FIGHTING SELF DEFENSE AND INTERNAL MARTIAL ARTS

   HOME       ABOUT       ENDORSEMENTS       CLASSES       VIDEO CLIPS       FREE NEWSLETTER       FORUM       VIDEO ON DEMAND!       SHOP       CONTACT/FAQS       BARE-HANDS TO HANDGUNS     
 

   

============================
KI CHUAN DO TRAINING TIPS #5:
============================

We had the following question regarding KCD TIPS #2
(WHAT TO DO IF YOU CAN'T ATTEND KCD
CLASSES IN NEW YORK?):

Reader: "This is very helpful but I am wondering why there is no
mention of Wing Chung. It seems that Siu Lim Tau would help
develop some of the sensitivity that KCD seeks to cultivate. I do
wonder if Wing Chung is perhaps too rigid for real combat situations
but I am tempted to pursue it, partly because there is a good school
near where I live.

Any thoughts about the efficacy and applicability of Wing Chun
techniques to real-world self defense, and to supplementing KCD
training, would be much appreciated."

John Perkins had the following answer:

"I would state that if a person could practice the KCD drills faithfully
he/she could improve any art. I believe that we must emphasize faithful
drill practice because many bad habits can result in learning another art
which relies on tagging an opponent for points or as most do, just has a
person respond with a memorized response to a choreographed movement.

The KCD drills will improve even a gymnast's balance. It will improve
a Tai Chi practitioner's balance. There is a blind drill that I haven't taught in
class which will help someone who practices alone. Here you can have a
person swing a heavy bag or just a bean bag on a string while they close
their eyes. They can make it swing to and fro or in a circle. The person can
then place his/her hand toward the direction they believe that the bag will
be and attempt to feel-- sort of catch the bag on the back of the hand and
attempt to follow the bag with as little collision as possible.

They can also stand on a balance board and push one or more hanging
bean bags and attempt to follow them by touch with their eyes closed.
The bags should be pushed away from the body and caught by the
back of the hand, elbow or any part of the arm as it returns whereupon
the person can continue to follow by feel alone where the bag is going.
They can push the bag slowly to all positions possible with the hand,
elbow etc. as far out as their reach allows and them alternate with
pushing the bag beyond their reach and again finding it in mid air
with the hand or elbow while eyes are closed. This will develop
simultaneous balance and sensitivity.

They can also hang a piece of bamboo from a string and do the
same. This will allow a higher and lower area to touch. If they are
able to they can hang the object lower to the ground and push and
catch with sensitivity with their feet both with eyes open then closed.
With a small 25 lb. heavy bag they can catch with sensitivity and
push with force to repel the bag. I hope this helps. JP"

Matt Kovsky also added this comment:

"A Wing Chun school can be very useful to your practice, but it
depends on the school and the mindset of your partners. I have a
training partner where I work who is a Wing Chun instructor taught
by Moy Yat. He is very open minded and he works his Chi Sao
while I do my contact flow. Nevertheless, I find his structure
rigid and his looseness low, and this reduces his sensitivity and
ability to adapt strikes and defenses.

He is a formidable fighter in his own right. He would be downright
dangerous if he used more KCD-like principles. If I make a comment
about it, he'll say: "this is the way we do it. We have certain
techniques and that's what we use" I don't have enough experience
with many wing chun practitioners to really know, but the three
I have worked out with, (including another instructor who visited
our school) were all fairly tight with limited sensitivity. Remember,
KCD is all about adaptability, versatility, Guided Chaos and natural
motion and physics. We don't have "KCD Techniques" per se.
If it works, we use it. But I do think chi sao practice at a wing chun
school is potentially very helpful."

================================
ATTACKPROOF.COM
Home of Martial Realists:
"A true link between Internal and External Martial Arts"
================================